NYTF Newsletter

January 2020

“We welcome anyone who wishes to stand with us in this resurgent climate of division to join us in celebration and in unity.”


Last year’s “Soul to Soul” concert.Tony Perry, Magda Fishman, Elmore James, and Lisa Fishman.

Soul to Soul

Soul to Soul, the electrifying and emotionally captivating theatrical concert that explores the parallels of African American and Jewish history takes the stage this Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend and will include for the first time the participation of Oscar- and Grammy-nominated IMPACT Repertory Theatre.

Photographed: Janet Jackson with Members of Impact Repertory Theater

The event will begin with an introduction by Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, Executive Vice President of The New York Board of Rabbis, and New York City Council Member Robert E. Cornegy, Jr., who represents the Council’s 36th District spanning Bedford Stuyvesant and Crown Heights.

Left to right: Tom Perry, Magda Fishman, Lisa Fishman, Elmore James

Sunday, January 19, 2020, at 2 PM
In Yiddish and English with English supertitles.
Tickets start at $35


NYTF In The News

Artistic Director of NYTF – Zalmen Mlotek

By Joanne Palmer
January 9, 2020

Twin passions for Yiddish theater and social justice

It’s not clear if most people are driven consistently by one passion throughout their lives so that it’s traceable in a clear line from childhood through adulthood.

And what about two passions, distinct but working in tandem?
Zalmen Mlotek has that.


Theater of War Productions and the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, in partnership with the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene (NYTF) present,

Theater of War Productions and the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, in partnership with National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene, will present readings of scenes from Peter Weiss’ play The Investigation, a piece of documentary theater adapted from the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trials of 1963-65 when 22 mid- and lower-level Nazi officials were tried for crimes against humanity in the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex. The project will center on guided audience discussions about mass murder and its lasting impact upon individuals, families, communities, and countries throughout the world. The presentation will be performed by a diverse cast, including international performers from communities affected by genocide.

Featuring (Pictured above from left to right):
John Doman (“The Wire”), Jesse Eisenberg (“The Social Network”), Kathryn Erbe (“Law & Order: Criminal Intent”), Jacqueline Murekatete (Rwandan Genocide Survivor), Jennifer Mudge (“The Irishman”), Chris Henry Coffey (“Chicago Fire”), Zach Grenier (“The Good Wife”) NYC Public Advocate, Consolee Nishimwe (Rwandan Genocide Survivor), Josh Hamilton (“Eighth Grade”), David Patrick Kelly (“Twin Peaks”), Marjolaine Goldsmith (“Dress”), Jumaane Williams (Antigone in “Ferguson”).

A stand-by ticket lottery will start at 5 PM.
Names will be drawn at random at 7 PM.

Thursday, January 16, 2020, at 7 PM


NYTF Radio

Host: Toney Brown

Podcast:
The Investigation

In today’s special edition episode, we talk about our upcoming events centered around Social Justice. We talk about our concert Soul to Soul (An Annual MLK Jr. Tradition). Then we sit down with Theater of War Artistic Director Bryan Doerries to talk about his company, the audience’s role in a theatrical performance, and their staged reading and town hall discussion of Peter WeissThe Investigation.


Concert:
Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz

Celebrating the resilience of Jewish music and culture

Organized by the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust and the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene, will feature: Itzhak PerlmanThe Klezmer Conservatory Band; Klezmer icons Hankus NetskyAndy StatmanFrank London, and Lorin SklambergTovah FeldshuhCantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot, Park East Synagogue; Director Joel Grey and the Cast and Orchestra of Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish, with Musical Director Zalmen MlotekHaZamir: The International Jewish Teen Choir, with Musical Director Matthew Lazar; and Eleanor Reissa.

The concert will take place at 7:00 PM on Monday, January 27, 2020,
at Temple Emanu-El, 1 East 65th Street, New York.
General admission tickets are $54, and reserved seating $180. 


VIDEO

Joel Grey and the Cast of Fiddler On The Roof in Yiddish

Joel Grey delivers moving speech at the closing of Fiddler On The Roof in Yiddish


Let’s Dish in Yiddish

This month’s “Let’s Dish in Yiddish” is dedicated to my Beautiful Mom, Fagi Rachel Epstein Eisen, who passed at 96 years old on December 6, 2019.

Besides loving Hebrew and Yiddish all of her life..she was married 76 years to my Father, who lives in Baltimore and leaves 4 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren.

Ellen Eisen & her mother Fagi Rachel Epstein Eisen

A shlechteh mameh iz nitto.

“There is no such thing as a bad mother ”In the Jewish Religion and Home the Woman is referred to in many ways as the HEART of the Home.

On Shabbos Prayers, we invite the Shabbos Queen…

And the Women of the house Bench Licht, or light the Shabbos Candles. Beautiful Songs for the “ Yiddishe Momme” have been sung by our greatest Cantors and many Female Personalities, from Sophie Tucker to the Barry Sisters. In recent years the Virtuoso Itzhak Perlman has a rendition of “ A Yiddishe Mamme” and even Klezmer bands such as the Maxwell Street Klezmer Band have paid homage to the “Jewish Mother” in song. Often this song brings many to tears as they Reminisce and think of the Days of Old Shtetl life and how the Legend of the Yiddishe Mamma began.
It also reminds us that though we have assimilated into many Modern Societies …we must remember our Roots and cherish them always.


From our friends at the Yiddish Book Center

Michael Yashinsky’s Oral History

From our friends at the Yiddish Book Center – A growing collection of in-depth interviews with people of all ages and backgrounds, whose stories about the legacy and changing nature of Yiddish language and culture offer a rich and complex chronicle of Jewish identity.


Join The Tradition!

Everything’s better in the Mamme Loshen.
Thank you National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene. 
Jackie Hoffman



December 2019

The Realization of a Dream

Daring To Dream

Avrom Goldfaden’s Di Kishefmakherin (The Sorceress) holds a special place both in history and in my heart. It is the first piece of Yiddish theater ever to be performed in the United States and also the first Yiddish operetta that I personally encountered when I began working at the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene. Soon after my arrival, in the fall of 2003, NYTF presented a concert of the songs and a few short scenes from the show and I was instantly under the Sorceress’ spell.

Over the next 10 years, we reprised that scaled-down concert version a few times and each time I fantasized how exciting a fully realized production might be. For so many years it seemed out of reach for our struggling, little theater company, until we began our residency at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Our move to MJH doubled the size of our venue and opened an enormous door in terms of cast and orchestra size which is evidenced by the success of Di Goldene Kale (The Golden Bride) and Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish.

Once we were at the Museum, the sky was the limit and we launched the Global Restoration Initiative to breathe new life into the best and most historically significant works of the Yiddish theater and re-imagine them for today’s audiences. In our mind, the selection of The Sorceress to be the first fully restored operetta was a natural choice.

Picking Up The Pieces

Our journey began with the published Piano Vocal score, but there were still many missing parts.  As luck would have it, we were able to locate the libretto in the Steven Spielberg Digital Library at the Yiddish Book Center as well as orchestrations from over 100 years ago in the Vilna Collection of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

With these integral puzzle pieces in hand, Zalmen Mlotek (NYTF Artistic Director), Dmitri Zisl Slepovitch and I set about sorting through the material to shape a modern telling of this story.  The music was digitized note by note, the script transliterated and translated and after many months of this discovery process, we were ready to put what we have to the test.

Getting The Show On Its Feet

Our first concert version was in the fall of 2017 and was performed with a scaled-down orchestra.  The goal was to determine if the piece held together if the audience found it pleasing, and if so, what further adjustments would need to be made.

The following month we traveled to Bucharest, Romania for the 2nd International Yiddish Theatre festival hosted by the State Jewish Theater for a joint workshop.  This was an especially moving experience as Romania is the home of the Yiddish theater and also where The Sorceress debuted in 1877. Continuing work on this show in its birthplace really enhanced the process and added a lot to the finished product.

For one week, we rehearsed with a company featuring three actors from NYTF, fifteen actors from the Romanian Jewish theater and one actor from Strasbourg, France as well as an orchestra featuring both American and Romanian musicians.  By the end of the week, we presented our workshop to a packed house who instantly fell for the Sorceress’ charms.

The voyage continued in December of 2017 when we presented five sold-out workshop presentations with our own cast of NYTF actors, six of whom would go on to join the cast of the critically acclaimed and awarded Fiddler.  This time, we had a full orchestra, but the sets were limited to projected renderings of what the scenic design might look like, augmented by a few pieces of furniture, but along with colorful costumes, it painted the picture of the vibrant production that this classic operetta would become.

Again another hit! The audiences were thrilled, with 93% of those surveyed saying that they would like to see the production fully realized.

Realizing The Dream

And so here we are today, having built a new production of a 140-year-old work, based on the lessons we learned along the way. This is just the first of many plays, musicals and operettas which we will be bringing you in future seasons from our restoration project.  We can’t wait for you to see The Sorceress and we know that it will thrill you the same way that it thrilled audiences generations ago.


Opening Night Celebration

The Sorceress (Di Kishefmakherin) is the inaugural production of NYTF’s Global Restoration Initiative, whose mission is to rescue and restore the essential music, lyrics, and scripts of once “lost” works of Yiddish theatre. This historic operetta was the first Yiddish theatre performed in America, brought to our shores in 1882 by a 14-year-old Boris Thomashefsky.

The evening includes a dazzling production of  The Sorceress followed by an elegant dessert and champagne reception with the cast, creative team, and orchestra. Price: $250 per person. 


Enrich your theatre-going experience

DECEMBER 4, 2019 – Bryan Doerris, Theatre of War

Human trafficking, the separation of families, and other forms of oppression and violence.

On the surface, The Sorceress seems a light-hearted, harmless fairytale, but peel back a few layers with Theater of War Productions’ Artistic Director Bryan Doerries to discover that there is dark side to this musical that illustrates the horror of human trafficking in Romania during this time


December 12, 2019 – Alyssa Quint, YIVO

The Dangers of the City in Goldfaden’s The Sorceress: some historical notes.


Alyssa Quint is the author of The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater recently published by Indiana UP.


December 18, 2019 – Nahma Sandrow, YIVO

The Lively American Debut of Yiddish Theater.

After the final curtain, while you’re still humming the tunes, there will be a lot to talk about. After all, The Witch was one of the first Yiddish plays ever written, the first professional Yiddish show in America, Boris Tomashevky’s debut vehicle as a boy soprano, and a favorite at the box office for over a century. 


NYTF Radio

Get excited for the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene’s production of The Sorceress, by subscribing to our brand new podcast: NYTF Radio.  NYTF Radio, hosted by Toney Brown, serves to educate listeners on the history of Yiddish Theatre and Jewish performative culture. 

The first season which debuted on Wednesday, November 20th will consist of four episodes exploring the early history of Yiddish Theatrical Performance in Europe and the United States. From Purim spiels to Avrom Goldfaden and The Sorceress, to late 19th Century Yiddish Theatre in America. Featured guests include Professor Joel Berkowitz of University Wisconsin Milwaukee (Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage), author Nahma Sandrow (Vagabond Stars: A World History of Yiddish Theatre), Artistic Director Zalmen Mlotek, Actor Mikhl Yashinsky, Associate Artistic Director Motl Didner, and longtime company member Itzy Firestone.

Be sure to subscribe, tune in, rate, and comment!


Digital Exhibit

Leaders of the New York–based YIVO examine the crates of books and documents that had been packed in Vilna by the Paper Brigade and sent to Germany by the Nazis.
YIVO Archives

Would you risk your life for a book?

A group of poets and scholars living under Nazi rule in the Vilna Ghetto did. Under the most harrowing conditions, they saved numerous cultural treasures from the Nazis, among them parts of the score of this show, Di kishefmakherin, or The Sorceress.


Video

Auschwitz Remembered:
An NYC-ARTS Special

Now available to view online, Paula Zahn hosts a special, one-hour edition of “NYC-ARTS”, THIRTEEN’s weekly arts and culture showcase, that explores the importance and timeliness of Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. exhibition at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.

The one-hour special features interviews with Bruce Ratner, Chairman of the Board of The Museum of Jewish Heritage; Ronald S. Lauder, Founder and Chairman of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation Committee and President of the World Jewish Congress; and members of the community of Holocaust survivors.

Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the history of Auschwitz and its role in the Holocaust ever presented in North America, bringing together more than 700 original objects and 400 photographs from over 20 institutions and museums around the world. In response to demand, the exhibition’s run was recently extended to August 2020. For more information and tickets, visit Auschwitz.nyc



You don’t need to be fluent in Yiddish to get the mood of what’s being said. It is the most animated language there is!”

Each month, Ellen will take us on a journey back in time to a shtetl far, far away where we will explore the origins and meanings of both well-known and little-known Yiddish sayings. Here is the first one, enjoy!


Az me muz, ken men
When one must, one can


Chanukah will be celebrated this year on December 22nd this year.
Chanukah is considered to be a Happy Jewish Holiday. When we are young Chanukah can represent 8 days of gifts and gelt! (sometimes real money and sometimes in the form of a gold chocolate coin!)

It can represent an obelisk-shaped toy that spins around, the dreidel… and lighting a colorful Menorah.

But Chanukah to me represents the “ Miracle of Chanukah”  when only one day of oil was left … yet the Light burnt for 8 days!

The tenacity of the Jewish people has always been to guard, protect, and keep our faith under any circumstances even when perhaps the difficulties seemed insurmountable. The Jewish people have kept the traditions and joy alive for our religion for many ages… and will continue to do so for many more, despite the challenges which are faced by our people.

Is that not Miraculous?

Ellen B. Eisen is an International Business Woman and TV Personality. But, her love for the Arts and especially Mamaloshen brings her to join our Folksbienne Newsletter.

Ellen is associated with many theatre companies and film festivals in both New York and Palm Beach County, Florida. As she always says, “You love YIDDISH the moment you hear if, the language has such soul and rhythm.


Join The Tradition!

Everything’s better in the Mamme Loshen.
Thank you National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene. 
Jackie Hoffman


Newsletter

November 2019

Top 5 Reasons to See the first Yiddish Musical ever produced in America

1. Yiddish Theatre came to America with The Sorceress

The Sorceress was the first Yiddish theatre production in the United States, establishing Second Avenue in the “Jewish” Lower East Side (now the East Village) as the Yiddish Theater District. In the subsequent three decades, New York would see the establishment of over a dozen Yiddish theatres and the founding of the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbeine which—now in its 105th season—is the oldest consecutively producing theatre company in the country. The influence of Yiddish theatre on today’s performing artists is undeniable, and today’s theatergoers are embracing the roots of modern-day theatre—with translation assistance, of course. This is evidenced in the popularity of NYTF’s production of Fiddler on the Roof (A Fidler Afn Dakh) which plays to sold-out theaters and has won multiple awards. 

Yivo Collection. After WWII

2. You’ve heard of the Monuments Men, now meet the YIVO Scholars.

While most clandestine work in the Vilna ghetto likely centered around smuggling food for survival and valuables for bribes, a group of YIVO Vilna scholars and others risked their lives secreting priceless cultural gems—music, rare books, manuscripts, and plays—into milk jugs and under floorboards and other hideaways. This was perilous work, and those who took it on knew their survival was unlikely; but they were hopeful the Nazis would lose the war and there would be a time when Jewish life would return. The Sorceress, written in 1878 by Avram Goldfaden, is one of the very earliest works of Yiddish theatre; and the fully restored orchestrations are based, in part, on pre-Holocaust musical arrangements which were saved from destruction at the hands of the Nazis by the YIVO Scholars. This fully-staged work is the culmination of a project which NYTF began in 2017 to restore this classic. NYTF’s Global Restoration Initiative identifies the best examples of Yiddish operettas, musicals, and plays; reassembles librettos and scores in a digital format (rendering them useable to artists and scholars), and presents the work to audiences often for the first time in a half-century or more. The Sorceress is fulfilling the Folksbiene’s dream of rescuing and restoring the essential works of the Yiddish theatre.

Courtesy of NYPL in public domain

3. Chutzpah!

In 1882, 14-year-old Boris Thomashefsky, who had only recently immigrated to the United States, was working in a cigarette factory where he enjoyed his co-workers singing tunes from Yiddish theatre, including The Sorceress. Though he had never seen Yiddish theatre in his native Ukraine, he loved the tunes so much that he convinced a Bowery beer hall owner to finance his production of The Sorceress. The partner paid for a Yiddish theatre troupe from London to travel to New York for the production. On opening night, Thomashefsky learned that the woman who was to play one of the female lead – Mirele – was no longer available due to dubious circumstances. Thomashefsky reportedly performed the role in drag. And the role of the Sorceress traditionally has been played by a man—a dream role for some of the greatest leading men of their time including Maurice Schwartz and Benjamin Zuskin of the State Jewish Theater in Moscow.

Mikhl Yashinsky as Bobe Yahkne

4. Mikhl Yashinsky stars as the Sorceress, taking leave from his role in the Yiddish-language Fiddler on the Roof currently playing in midtown.

Yashinsky first played the role of the Sorceress (Bobe Yakhne) when NYTF staged a lauded reading in 2017. Yashinsky describes the musical: It is melodramatic, operatic, romantic, exotic, fantastic entertainment such as would have delighted the Jews of Eastern Europe at its premiere in 1877 and still delivers its distinct charms to anyone, anywhere today, while still reeking wonderfully (and somehow refreshingly!) of its strange nineteenth-century perfume. There are scenes set in the lair where the witch does her divining, at a sixteen year-old’s birthday party in a beautiful garden, at a coffeehouse in Istanbul. It is nothing like a piece of musical theatre that would get written today, and thank God — and Goldfaden (the playwright) — for that!

The Sorceress. Left to Right: Pat Constant, Stephanie Lynne Mason, Michael Yashinsky, Steve Sterner, Rachel Botchan

5. Will Good trump Evil?

On the surface,The Sorceress is a fairy tale. But as a metaphor, it is about the avarice-fueled oppression of innocents using the tools of family separation, human trafficking, and violence. The metaphor still works today as it did when it was written—in Romania during the time of the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878. NYTF presents theatre that transcends language and time. The Sorceress is part of NYTF’s season of “Spiritual Resistance,” which features artistic and theatrical works that explore themes of struggle against oppression. The programming provides artistic expression concurrent with the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away. being presented at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.


The Sorceress – YIVO Digital Exhibit

Leaders of the New York–based YIVO examine the crates of books and documents that had been packed in Vilna by the Paper Brigade and sent to Germany by the Nazis.
YIVO Archives

Rescuing Culture: How Jewish Treasures Were Saved from the Nazis

This December, before each performance of ‘The Sorceress’, don’t forget to look for our special YIVO-curated digital gallery in the lobby of the Museum Of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.


The Sorceress – Post Show Discussions

Enrich your “The Sorceress” theatre-going experience with these post-show discussions

DECEMBER 4, 2019

Brian Doerris, Theatre of War

Brian Doerris, Theatre of War

Human trafficking, the separation of families, and other forms of oppression and violence.
On the surface, The Sorceress seems a light-hearted, harmless fairytale, but peel back a few layers with Theater of War Productions’ Artistic Director Bryan Doerries to discover that there is dark side to this musical that illustrates the horror of human trafficking in Romania during this time.

Click to Buy Tix to December 4


December 12, 2019

Alyssa Quint, YIVO

Alyssa Quint, YIVO

The Dangers of the City in Goldfaden’s The Sorceress: some historical notes.

Alyssa Quint is the author of The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater recently published by Indiana UP. 

Click to Buy Tix to December 12


December 18, 2019

Nahma Sandrow, YIVO

Nahma Sandrow, YIVO

The Lively American Debut of Yiddish Theater.
After the final curtain, while you’re still humming the tunes, there will be a lot to talk about. After all, The Witch was one of the first Yiddish plays ever written, the first professional Yiddish show in America, Boris Tomashevky’s debut vehicle as a boy soprano, and a favorite at the box office for over a century. 

Click to Buy Tickets to December 18


The Sorceress – Special Event

Combine the perfect match! Kosher Chinese food from Park & Madison Caterers with Fun-filled Yiddish Entertainment ‘The Sorceress Musical’ into one unique day to remember. 

And who doesn’t love a pastrami egg roll?

Show + Buffet Dinner Package goes on sale Nov.15!


NYTF Announcement

NYTF Welcomes a New Executive Director

Dominick Balletta  joined the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene as Executive Director on Nov. 1. He comes to NYTF from the  Jacob Burns Film Center . He produces for theater and film. Film credits:  Another Telepathic Thing, I’m Carolyn Parker , (Jonathan Demme, Dir.),  Deconstructing The Beatles . He received a 2009 Tony Award nomination as a producer of Moisés Kaufman’s  33 Variations  starring Jane Fonda.  He is an Advisor to the DeVos Institute of Arts Management.


Special Collaboration

The Investigation

This fall and winter the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene will be partnering on two exciting projects with  Theater of War Productions , a New York-based social impact company that works with leading film, theater, and television actors to present dramatic readings of seminal plays followed by community-driven discussions about pressing public health and social issues. For more than ten years, Theater of War Productions has engaged diverse audiences all over the world in powerful, healing dialogue about challenging subjects, such as trauma, racism, addiction, domestic violence, and police/community relations. 

On November 13th and 14th , in collaboration with the Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, we will premiere  The Investigation at St. Ann & the Holy Trinity Church in Brooklyn , presenting scenes from Peter Weiss’ play  The Investigation , a piece of searing documentary theater adapted from the Frankfurt Auschwitz War Crimes Trials of 1963-1965, as a catalyst for guided discussions about mass murder and its lasting impact upon individuals, families, communities, and countries throughout the world. The November performances will feature a cast of acclaimed actors including: David Zayas (Dexter), Amy Ryan (Birdman), Brian F. O’Byrne (Doubt), Zach Grenier (The Good Wife), and John Doman (The Wire), among others, including several survivors of genocide who will take part in the reading. Reserve free seats

The Investigation  will also be presented at the Museum of Jewish Heritage on January 16th as part of its International Holocaust Remembrance programming and in conjunction with the exhibition  Auschwitz: Not Long ago. Not Far Away. Reserve free seats.

The Investigation is made possible by the generous support of Bruce Ratner.


Museum of Jewish Heritage- A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

Kristallnacht Commeration Events

To mark the 81st anniversary of Kristallnacht , the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust offers a series of commemorative events and programs.

Kristallnacht refers to the anniversary of a series of mob attacks organized by the Nazi Party against Jews on November 9 and 10, 1938 throughout Germany, annexed Austria, and in areas of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia occupied by German troops. This came to be called Kristallnacht , or The Night of Broken Glass because of the shattered glass that littered streets after the destruction and vandalism of Jewish-owned businesses, synagogues, and homes as well as cemeteries.

Around 7,500 Jewish-owned businesses, homes, and schools were plundered, and at least 91 Jews were murdered. Approximately 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to concentration camps. Kristallnacht was a turning point in the history of the Third Reich, marking the shift from antisemitic rhetoric and legislation to the violent, aggressive anti-Jewish measures that would culminate with the Holocaust.

On Sunday, November 10, the Museum will have extended hours – open 10 AM to 9 PM – and will provide a public candle-lighting area in the Anne & Bernard Spitzer Grand Foyer and free admission to MJH Highlights – Ordinary Treasures: Highlights from the Museum of Jewish Heritage Collection , The Pickman Keeping History Center, and Andy Goldsworthy’s contemplative Garden of Stones.

Entry to the acclaimed exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. requires a separate, paid ticket.  Reserve your tickets in advance.

In addition, there will be two free programs:1 PM  Stories Survive Speaker Series: Eugene Polinsky , who during World War II flew secret missions to drop spies and supplies to support the resistance in occupied countries. Reserve >

2 PM  Dr. Yaffa Eliach Third Annual Memorial Lecture: “The World of Auschwitz” with Distinguished Research Scholar Debórah Dwork . Reserve >

Commemorative free programs continue on Monday, November 11:2 PM  Stories Survive: An Eyewitness Account of Kristallnacht with Ruth Zimbler . When she was 10 years old, Ruth and her brother Walter watched from their apartment as the largest synagogue in Vienna was destroyed. Reserve >

7 PM   Kristallnacht History & Significance. Professor Natalia Aleksiun will discuss the history leading up to Kristallnacht , and the impact of Kristallnacht on the religious, economic, and social dynamics of Jews within Germany and Nazi-occupied territory. Reserve >


From our friends- JCC Manhattan

JCC Manhattan 
Mon, Nov 4, 7–8:30 pm
Renia’s Diary: A Holocaust Journal — Discussion with Elizabeth and Alexandra Bellak

As we prepare to mark the 76th anniversary of Kristallnacht , join us for a discussion about Renia’s Diary , the long-hidden journal of a young Polish woman’s life during the Holocaust. We will be joined by Elizabeth Bellak , Renia’s sister, and Elizabeth’s daughter, Alexandra Bellak , who will share how they worked together to preserve and share Renia’s story with the world for the first time. Copies of Renia’s Diary will be available for purchase after the Q+A.

Click to Read More


From our friends – TIKVAH

Tikvah
Free online course

Don’t miss the incredible opportunity to study the magnificent stories that inspired  Fiddler on the Roof  with the best teacher in the business – Harvard Professor, Ruth Wisse.

Tikvah’s 8-part online course on the Tevye stories is a true tour de force, exploring everything from assimilation and anti-Semitism to the threat of revolutionary socialism and the meaning of faith. And when you’ve finished it, you’ll understand why Sholem Aleichem’s original stories are even richer than their musical adaptation.

Click to Read More



The Sorceress(Di Kishefmakherin)  is the inaugural production of NYTF’s Global Restoration Initiative, whose mission is to rescue and restore the essential music, lyrics, and scripts of once “lost” works of Yiddish theatre. This historic operetta was the first Yiddish theatre performed in America, brought to our shores in 1882 by a 14-year-old Boris Thomashefsky.

The evening includes a dazzling production of  The Sorceress followed by an elegant dessert and champagne reception with the cast, creative team and orchestra. Price: $250 per person. 

Purchase before Nov. 11 at 5:00 pm and receive a pair of seats for $400.

RSVP

or call  212.213.2120 x230
for reservations and further information.



Join The Tradition!

Everything’s better in the Mamme Loshen.

Thank you National Yiddish Theatre Folksbeine. 

Jackie Hoffman